Mythbusters

It's surprising how many of us don't know fact from fiction when it comes to alcohol. Our mythbuster helps you get to grips with what's what (and what's not!)

  • Sensible drinking? That’s about 2 or 3 drinks a day.

    Fact:

    The sensible drinking guidelines are that women should not regularly drink more than 2-3 units a day (3-4 for men) and unless you know the units in your drink, you can’t be sure. Take a look at our unit calculator to find out more.

  • Women can drink just as much as men if they want.

    Fact:

    Not true. With smaller bodies (including smaller livers) and a different physical make-up, alcohol affects women differently – which is why the sensible drinking guidelines for women are lower.

  • A glass of wine now and then is nothing to worry about.

    Fact:

    In just one large glass of wine, there can be about 3 units. It’s easy to see how easily the alcohol can add up.

  • Overdoing it now and then, where's the harm in that?

    Fact:

    Over time, regularly drinking more than the sensible drinking guidelines will affect your appearance and general health. But it can also disrupt your sleep and lead to an increased risk of high blood pressure, cause chronic liver disease to develop, and even increase your risk of breast cancer.

  • A glass of wine with a meal every day is fine.

    Fact:

    Although it’s always better to eat when you drink alcohol, everyone should have at least 2 alcohol-free days every week to give your body a break.

  • The best cure for a hangover is a “hair of the dog”.

    Fact:

    It’s actually a very bad idea – more alcohol is the last thing you need! If you drink more than the sensible drinking guidelines, you should have at least 48 hours with no alcohol to help your body recover.

  • A drink keeps you warm in the cold weather.

    Fact:

    Although alcohol makes you feel warmer, in reality it lowers your body temperature. That’s why people who fall asleep drunk outside are at risk of hypothermia – and even death.

  • It’s OK to give your older children a drink now and then.

    Fact:

    Alcohol affects the development of young people’s brains – so the best, most healthy start is an alcohol-free childhood.

  • Having a drink makes you happier.

    Fact:

    Low or moderate amounts of alcohol can make you feel good – but can also make any negative emotions stronger too. Drinking more can actually cause anxiety and depression.

  • Eating a big meal before you drink means you won’t get as drunk.

    Fact:

    Although eating when you drink is a good idea, because it delays the effects of the alcohol, if you drink too many units you could still be storing up trouble for yourself.

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